Prostate Problems: Is it Preventable?

Nutritional researches now supports the view that prostatitis is often preventable and responds very successfully to simple lifestyle changes, diet and nutritional supplementation. Orthodox medicine considers prostate enlargement to be a normal consequence of the aging process. Certainly its occurrence is so frequent in the 40-60 age group. However, just because something is common does not necessarily mean it is normal.


There is a great deal of evidence obtained by studying differing populations, animals and human subjects, that prostate problems are not a normal part of aging, but in fact related to diet and environmental toxicity.Studies of population groups that naturally live different lifestyles and have different eating habits are often used to show that these factors are important in preventing disease. It has been observed for example that the frequency of prostate cancer varies in different parts of the world. While the United States has a rate of 14 and Sweden 22 deaths per 100,000 population, Japan’s rate is only 2 per 100,000.

However, studies show that Japanese immigrants develop prostatic cancer at a similar rate to the country they migrate by adopting an environmental or local nutritional factor as the principal cause for these population differences.

It is quite possible that part of the cause of prostatic cancer is a result of the increasing toxic load of chemicals and pesticides in our environment and food. This points us towards avoidance of these chemicals when reasonably possible and protecting ourselves from their toxic effects by natural detoxifying and antioxidant supplements to our diet to help our body protect itself against this excessive toxic load.

There is ample clinical evidence that various nutritional factors such as zinc, essential fatty acids, flavinols and saw palmetto extract to name just a few, help prevent common prostatic disorders. Other studies relating to cancer prevention is general give us evidence that many types of cancer are also preventable by proper diet and adequate or supplemental antioxidants such as beta-carotene.

As in most diseases found more frequently in “civilized” countries, proper diet is the single most important preventative to prostate disorders. Research now points to a diet composed of plenty of fresh fruits and berries, raw and conservatively cooked vegetables, whole grains (high in fiber), seeds and nuts (especially pumpkin seeds), beans, fermented dairy products, fish, and few added fats and oils. High cholesterol levels are associated with prostate enlargement. The oils consumed should be cold pressed and high in essential fatty acids (e.g. sunflower oil).

Advances in nutritional research now enable us to understand why many traditional folk remedies have been so effective in treating prostate problems.

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