Learn to “read” your body: SIGNS of FUTURE DISEASES

 

Each day and every moment, the human body broadcasts all kind of clues that can foreshadow future problems. Once you know to “read” your body, you might be able to fight future potential diseases and successfully slow the aging process.


 

  • Your index finger length may indicate OSTEOARTHTRITIS

If you have a natural, born predisposition to osteoarthritis, subtle hints about future joint deterioration can be discovered by examining each finger. Studies have shown that women with index fingers shorter than their ring fingers are at higher risk for osteoarthritis. The estrogen and the testosterone are two hormones that are assumed to influence the evolution of osteoarthritis. These hormones also affect the length of fingers, particularly the ring finger. A man’s index finger is typically shorter than his ring finger because he receives more testosterone, while a woman’s index and ring fingers are more equal in length. And since osteoarthritis typically occurs at an advanced age when hormones wane, the relationship between finger length and osteoarthritis seems plausible.

  • Big breasts may be a sign of a potential TYPE 2 diabetesbody warning signs

Young breast tissue is comprised of highly active fat cells. People who are overweight are at much higher risk for type 2 diabetes, so breast size could be a marker for type 2 diabetes. This assumption was proven by a group of Canadian researchers who had found that women who wore a D cup or greater during their 20s had an increased risk of type 2 diabetes.

  • Pain located behind the knee may show blood clots, which can lead to STROKES, EMBOLISMS OR HEART ATTACK

Behind the knee, there is a large vein that, when blocked, can cause swelling that is hot to the touch and sometimes painful. Blood clots tend to form here because the knee sits low in the body and is crimped when the leg is bent, sometimes for hours on end. This prevents the one-way valves in the vein from flowing freely back up to the heart, causing blood to pool and become prone to clots. If these clots should break away and travel in the bloodstream, they can lodge in blood vessels elsewhere – in the brain (causing stroke), lungs (causing lung embolism) and heart (causing heart attack).

  • Abdominal fat may indicate A POTENTIAL TYPE 2 DIABETES, HEART DISEASE AND DEATH

Abdominal fat is a major risk factor for insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, heart disease and death. But now there is another reason to worry. Adults who find their waistlines expanding in middle age even if they had a normal body mass index (BMI) doubled their risk for getting dementia in their 70s. If they had both an increase in BMI and wide abdominal girth (greater than 25 cm around), the dementia risk was 3.6 times higher, compared to people with a healthy abdominal girth and BMI. The causal link is unclear, but it may be that fat wraps around organs in your midsection and releases chemicals that damage brain tissue. An increase in jean size in your 40s may predict cognitive decline later in life.

  • Dry Mouth – a sign of MENOPAUSE, DIABETES, THYROID DISEASE, PARKINSON’S DISEASE AND SLEEP APNEA

You wouldn’t think that something besides tooth loss would forecast old age, but the lack of saliva is also quite telling. There are lots of serious conditions that list dry mouth (xerostomia) as a prime symptom such as Sjogren’s syndrome, an autoimmune disease that affects glands that lubricate, including salivary glands. Although dry mouth is not a normal consequence of aging, it can forewarn that another condition is underway. Dry mouth is also a symptom of menopause, diabetes, thyroid disease, Parkinson’s disease and sleep apneea, a dangerous sleep disorder that causes breathing to stop and start a few times a night.

  • Ear Lobe Crease may indicate a future HEART DISEASE

A diagonal crease on one or both ears (it looks like an earring has been ripped out of the ear) that begins at the bottom of the ear opening and reaches diagonally across the lobe to the tip, can signal a future of heart disease. Experts aren’t sure why a crease here also correlates to thickened arteries that supply the heart, but it can show up long before a heart attack occurs.

Read more:

  • doctoroz.com

 

 

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